Under new proposed law, no one in CT can accidentally download child porn

There can be little doubt that abuse of children has been the cause du jour. Children do get abused and used and should be protected. To that end, there’s a new bill in the CT legislature that seeks to make several “technical changes” to the child pornography laws, but which actually makes it impossible for anyone to avoid a five year minimum prison sentence, no matter how one came into possession of the video.

There’s a growing discussion among those who observe the effects of the harsh punishment meted out by our black-and-white justice system on the people who are the subject of these zero-tolerance laws: the similar treatment of those who engage in sexual behavior with children and those who, without ever touching a child, view pictures and videos of children in sexual situations or engaging in sexual acts.

In other words, people are starting to realize that the two situations are disparate and should be treated as such. For one thing, the federal sentencing guidelines are over-the-top and maddeningly inconsistent. For instance:

Wednesday is link dump day

You know the drill, baby, drill!

Okay enough procrastination; get to work.

Prosecution by installment: the King Bruce theory

King Bruce of Scotland, you will recall, was a king driven into exile by those damn British. During the course of this, he was taking refuge in a cave, defeated, when he chanced upon a spider which was unable to spin a web, presumably having nothing to do with the fact that it was Scottish and hence drunk. So it tried and failed and tried and failed until it finally succeeded, which gave the Good King Bruce an epiphany that if you try enough times you will eventually succeed at what you want. He then promptly defeated the British and Scotland has been an independent country ever since but he doesn’t get nearly all the credit that Mel Gibson does presumably because he wasn’t wearing blue war paint.

I know what you were thinking. Pervert.

Just last week, the Connecticut Appellate Court issued an opinion [PDF] endorsing the ‘King Bruce’ theory of prosecutions: try as many times as you want. But in order to understand the opinion in State v. Brundage II, you have to start at the beginning with State v. Brundage I.

In the beginning, Brundage was a creep. Over a period of roughly 8 years, he allegedly sexually assaulted his then-girlfriend’s daughter. The girlfriend ended the relationship in 2003 and the girl finally reported the abuse in 2007.

He was charged by the prosecution with two counts of Sexual Assault in the First Degree and two counts of Risk of Injury to a Minor. Out of all the possible crimes available to them, these are the two they chose to proceed on. Brundage, on cue, got convicted and was sentenced to a long time in jail.

Except he appealed, claiming that the criminal charges were actually barred by the statute of limitations. On appeal, the prosecution and the Appellate Court agreed that all charges for all incidents occurring prior to 2003 were barred and could not be prosecuted:

Mama said knock you out

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What can be more frightening to the innocent man walking down a city street, minding his own business, when a bunch of thugs comes out of nowhere, and for no apparent reason, violently strikes that innocent man causing him physical injury?

Nothing, which is why there was widespread panic last year about the emergence of a new activity that further signaled the moral decay of America’s urban youth: the knockout game.

A game in which seemingly innocent people were randomly targeted to be punched in the head for no other reason than apparent boredom on the part of the hooligans.

And so it comes as no surprise that this viral act of violence that has put fear into the minds and hearts of innocent city working folk and has caused our urban areas to become veritable fields of random assaults has brought about a strict new legislative fix: by God we’ll fix ‘em.

The new bill, proposed by legislator and Police Officer Joe Verrengia of West Hartford, CT, would make a “knockout” punch a felony punishable by up to 5 years in jail1. The bill states (and I’ve reproduced the entire section because context is relevant):

(a) A person is guilty of assault in the second degree when:

(1) With intent to cause serious physical injury to another person, he causes such injury to such person or to a third person; or

(2) with intent to cause physical injury to another person, he causes such injury to such person or to a third person by means of a deadly weapon or a dangerous instrument other than by means of the discharge of a firearm; or

(3) he recklessly causes serious physical injury to another person by means of a deadly weapon or a dangerous instrument; or

(4) for a purpose other than lawful medical or therapeutic treatment, he intentionally causes stupor, unconsciousness or other physical impairment or injury to another person by administering to such person, without his consent, a drug, substance or preparation capable of producing the same; or

(5) he is a parolee from a correctional institution and with intent to cause physical injury to an employee or member of the Board of Pardons and Paroles, he causes physical injury to such employee or member; or

(6) with intent to cause the loss of consciousness of another person, he causes such injury to such person by a single punch or kick or other singular striking motion.

As you can see from the entire statute reproduced above, (6) is redundant. We must, of course, concede that “loss of consciousness” is “serious physical injury”. Putting aside caselaw that states that a fist or shoe can indeed be a dangerous instrument (thus covering subsections 2 and/or 3), subsection (6) seeks to carve out a specific subset of subsection (1), i.e. causing of serious physical injury. Subsection (1) has no restrictions on the type of injury (loss of consciousness) or the manner in which it is caused (single punch or kick).

So, simply put, (6) is useless. But that’s not all. The bill would make a conviction of subsection (6) have a mandatory prison sentence of at least 2 years.

The persecution of justice (updated)

i-dont-want-to-live-farnsworth

One of the more important things I write about here at ‘a public defender’ is the notion that “Justice” is a complicated concept. It is not limited to what you are fed through your televisions and it is certainly not a government-centric idea.

Justice takes many obvious forms, such as the apprehension and conviction of a criminal. But limiting the definition of justice to something as simplistic as “good guys vs. bad guys” leaves you with a very narrow worldview and an over-inflated sense of morality.

Justice can mean that the right person was punished and that the punishment was just. Justice can mean standing up for unpopular causes, maybe sometimes precisely because they are unpopular.

The persecution of this nuanced meaning of justice, however, has never been more fervent than in this day of “speak by shouting at others” discourse and base politics that pander to ever-extreme hysterical idiots who have found a sure-fire method of whipping up political points and ire by removing any semblance of complexity from American politics and intellectual discussion.

I speak, of course, of the shameful defeat of the president’s nomination of Debo Adegbile to head the civil rights division at the Department of Justice. Joined by 7 democrats, Republicans torpedoed this highly qualified, lifelong public servant from running the civil rights division because a long time ago, he spent some part of his career working for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, during which time he worked on a brief seeking to overturn the conviction of “noted cop-killer” Mumia Abu-Jamal.

Your bias is showing

My second column for the CT Law Tribune is online now. Since it’s technically behind the paywall, you have to click on the link in this Law Tribune tweet.

The column is about a South Carolina supreme court justice who publicly warned prosecutors to shape up on Brady violations and other misconduct and was the subject of recusal motions as a result.

It’s good. Go read it.

Wednesday is link dump day

Another Wednesday, another link dump. Don’t complain. Be happy that I care enough to share.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy has the next in a series of posts on the problems with the exclusionary doctrine.
  • By Radley Balko, a Fifth Circuit opinion that turns its back on a huge forensics scandal in Mississippi.
  • New Haven’s prison re-entry program gets a new name and a ‘Fresh Start‘.
  • A Federal District Judge in Connecticut essentially dismisses all of Mayor/Gubernatorial candidate Mark Boughton’s complaints about the disclosure of deposition transcripts and his ensuing thuggery. (Opinion [PDF])
  • Andrew Cohen is righteously angry about an Eight Circuit ruling that requires defense attorneys challenging lethal injection to propose an alternate, acceptable method of execution. No, really.
  • Florida cops do warrantless surveillance of cell phones and then claim that a non-disclosure agreement with the manufacturer prohibits them from seeking judicial oversight. No, really.
  • The official review of the Annie Dookhan state lab scandal in MA was completed, naming her the only “bad actor”, but leaving us all to wonder just how many people got screwed.
  • The opening briefs in the cell phone incident to arrest cases Riley and Wurie have been filed in the Supreme Court. Orin Kerr at Volokh has uploaded them.
  • Adam Steinbaugh, who you should read early and read often, investigates and exposes yet another revenge porn creep.