3 images about Ferguson you need to have handy today

I bet you’re all going to hang out with family today. All families, by law, have one or two racist fucktards who are gonna go on and on about how the Officer was defending himself and acting properly in the line of duty. They’re not gonna get it, but to explain that requires reading.

Here are three images – because people like your Uncle Bill aren’t the best at reading good – that you should print out and shove in their faces:

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Via. Note the staggering number of NA for Darren Wilson.

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Via. There’s more at the link.

And if you really want to troll someone – and why wouldn’t you? – there’s this:

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Via.

Happy Thanksgiving.

1 thing you should do after Ferguson

There are lots of websites out there giving you advice on what you can do to help and change things after Ferguson.

It’s cute. It’s stuff like “understand things better” or “hold hands y’all” or “be good to each other” or “realize that black lives matter”.

It’s hogwash. None of that will change anything. I’m here to give you the straight dope. The skinny. The real deal. The inside info.

Here’s what you should do to change things.

  1. Get on a jury.

  2. Vote to acquit.

Done. The more marginal, he-said she-said, uncorroborated, victim-less crimes you acquit defendants of, the less incentive there will be to prosecute such crimes, the less injustice there will be, the fewer police resources will be spent on bullshit and fewer people will die.

Here’s a comedian telling you essentially the same thing, but funnier:

This isn’t about Michael Brown

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This isn’t about Michael Brown1. Or rather, it isn’t about just Michael Brown. It certainly isn’t about only this Michael Brown. It’s about race, power and a system that just affirmed itself.

It’s about anger at a system which has trained the powerless to accept their lack of power over and over again. It’s about anger at a system, that despite the promises of the civil rights era, has only affirmed the status quo: some lives are worth more than others. Some people will always get punished more harshly than others.

It’s about anger that those who are the most underprivileged, the most disenfranchised continue to be subjugated under the guise of the best system in the world.

It’s about anger that the ethnic majority has historically viewed and continues to view minorities as dangerous and frightening. It’s about anger that the majority is doing its best to clutch onto its slipping grasp through intimidation and fear.

Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer, like many, many others have been shot and killed by police officers. Darren Wilson wasn’t indicted or charged for that shooting like an overwhelming number of police officers haven’t been charged. While whites are certainly victims of police brutality, minorities are overwhelmingly so.

The anger is because it seems that Michael Brown was shot because of his race – and that doesn’t mean Officer Wilson shot Michael Brown specifically because Michael Brown was black. Rather, Wilson shot Brown because of what he believed about black people; what we’ve all read and heard about black people; what we’ve all been conditioned to realize about black people; what popular media regularly portrayed black people as.

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And more:

So when he stopped, I stopped. And then he starts to turn around, I tell him to get on the ground, get on the ground.

He turns, and when he looked at me, he made like a grunting, like aggravated sound and he starts, he turns and he’s coming back towards me. His first step is coming towards me, he kind of does like a stutter step to start running. When he does that, his left hand goes in a fist and goes to his side, his right one goes under his shirt in his waistband and he starts running at me.

At this point it looked like he was almost bulking up to run through the shots, like it was making him mad that I’m shooting at him.

And the face that he had was looking straight through me, like I wasn’t even there, I wasn’t even anything in his way.

Like an animal. Michael Brown was an animal to Darren Wilson.

That’s what this anger is about. That this non-indictment exposed the gaping race chasm in America: white people love police and authority when it comes to maintaining the social order. That social order is fairly simple: there are the whites who can do whatever they want, then there are the “criminals” and the “minorities” and the “gays”, except those that act like the white people. The system exists to contain the teeming masses of minorities/criminals and to keep them in check. If a black man is killed by a police officer, well that’s his fault.

As I’ve written before, for White America, the police force exists as a private security force, to keep them and their belongings safe and secure and separate from the uncouth, uncivilized and dirty Blacks and Hispanics. (Here’s another must-read on the subject from The Atlantic.)

For the rest of America, the police force is sadly nothing but an oppressor acting with the imprimatur of the greatest Democracy in the World.

That’s what this anger is about. It’s about the death of one boy, for sure, but it’s also about the death of the right to be free and the right to be equal in America.

It’s about the death of Dr. King’s dream.


A Founding Father of incompetence

This is Thomas Jefferson:

BIO_Mini-Bios_0_Thomas-Jefferson_151078_SF_HD_768x432-16x9This is Dennis Hawver, dressed at Thomas Jefferson, surrounded by people who are inexplicably not laughing their asses off at him:

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Hawver, a Republican and Libertarian once ran for Governor of Kansas and then attorney general and also for Congress.

Needless to say, he failed in his quest for any office.

Perhaps in keeping with his Jeffersonian obsession, he was also a criminal defense attorney. He also failed at that – and spectacularly so – but this time he wasn’t the only one who lost. His client, facing the death penalty, was duly sentenced to death, because perhaps Hawver hadn’t grasped the fact that dressing like Jefferson doesn’t mean anything if you didn’t stand for his principles either:

At trial, Hawver described his client, Phillip Cheatham Jr., as a “professional drug dealer” and a “shooter of people,” according to findings of fact cited by the state supreme court. During the sentencing phase of the trial, he said the killer should be executed. “I had a single mitigator to offer the jury in sentencing,” Hawver said in an affidavit, “and that was my argument that my client was innocent.”

Hawver didn’t investigate alibi witnesses and didn’t track his client’s cellphone to find his location at the time of the murders, the court said.

As a defense lawyer, defending his client against the death penalty, there is generally one unbreakable rule: don’t tell the jury to execute your client.

Hawver also told jurors that they should execute the killer in his closing argument.

Oh. To be fair, this might have had something to do with his unusual tactics:

Hawver had never previously tried a capital murder case and had not tried a murder case in more than 20 years, according to the opinion. He was unfamiliar with ABA guidelines for trying capital murder cases.

And when I say a spectacular failure, I mean spectacular:

Hawver had said he had no funds for a pretrial investigation and he didn’t call the indigent defense board to explore whether funding was available to support his representation. He also said he didn’t recall whether a board representative had called him with an offer to provide co-counsel, investigators, consultants and expert witnesses, but he doesn’t contest that an offer of funding was made.

During the arguments, Hawver identifies Jefferson as his hero and says he wore the outfit because he had a constitutional right to represent the client “as directed, instructed and agreed” by the client, “no matter what the ABA guidelines have to say.”

Hawver explained to the Kansas Supreme Court why he didn’t get cellphone records for an alibi defense. “I had no idea that cellphones had GPS capabilities at that time,” he said. “Did you? I didn’t. If I had known it, I’d have been on it like a dog on a bone.”

Thankfully, in 2013, the Kansas Supreme Court reversed Cheatham’s conviction and just last week, spared any other individual of having to be represented by a Jefferson clone by disbarring Hawver.

The fact that Hawver showed up to the disbarment argument in Jefferson garb might have had something to do with it (A good shot of his attire is at five minutes and 17 seconds; his argument begins at 22 minutes and 38 seconds.):

 

6 horrifying things you learn as a death row inmate

I’ve written before about how dehumanizing prisons are and how badly inmates are treated by guards and of course I’ve written about the injustices of the system, but you folks seem to all be gravitating toward lists, so here’s a decidedly somber one from one of the funniest sites out there.

Luckily this man’s innocence was proved, but think of how many there are who are still seeking that vindication.

Dispensing with the sham: prosecutors serving as judges

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A judge usually wears many hats: jurist, prosecutor, defense attorney. A judge has to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a case in pre-trial negotiations, make offers, impose just sentences, etc.

Prosecutors usually end up being judges once they advance far enough in their careers and have schmoozed the right politicians.

Some prosecutors remain prosecutors even after they take the bench and Missouri is ensuring that they get ample practice in maintaining their bent1.

Neil Bruntrager, general counsel for the St. Louis Police Officer’s Association, works part time as a judge where police officers from county jurisdictions sometimes testify against defendants.  “There has never been a conflict. If there was I would remove myself,” Bruntrager said. “If anything, being a defense attorney makes me more sympathetic as a judge in terms of scrutinizing the evidence.”

St. Louis County and the Circuit Attorney’s offices both have full time prosecutors that are allowed to work part time as municipal judges. While prosecutors can do it, state law says public defenders cannot.

Here, have a look at how ridiculous it can get:

Attorney Ronald Brockmeyer works as a St. Charles divorce and criminal defense lawyer during the day, but by night he works part time prosecuting traffic violators in Dellwood. He also works part time as a judge in nearby Breckenridge Hills.

“I don’t think that’s a conflict at all,” Brockmeyer said. “Not at all.”

Brockmeyer makes $600 a session and isn’t alone in wearing multiple hats.

I’m the judge in Ferguson, a judge in Breckenridge Hills, a prosecutor in Florissant, a prosecutor in Vinita Park, and prosecutor here in Dellwood,” he said.

The defense attorney is a prosecutor and a judge and a prosecutor is always a prosecutor and a judge but never a defense attorney and a lawyer for cops is a prosecutor and a judge but never a defense attorney and public defenders are always defense attorneys but never judges and defendants are always screwed.

Justice.